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The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

MT NAEPWhat is NAEP? --- pronounced "Nape"
The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is a congressionally mandated project overseen by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to monitor knowledge, skill, and performance of the nation's children and youth over time. As the "Nation's Report Card," NAEP measures and reports on a regular basis what America's students know and can do in core subjects like reading, mathematics, writing, and science. For more information, visit http://nationsreportcard.gov                

Why is NAEP important?
Since 1969, NAEP has measured the educational progress of students in America. It has long been considered as the ‘gold standard’ of assessment. It is a ‘common yardstick’ measuring what students know and can do in various subjects.  It monitors achievement in a non-biased, independent fashion and provides a long term trend of how our students are performing.  For more information about Montana’s results, visit http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/states/

What is on the NAEP Web site?
The NAEP Web site offers numerous publicly available online tools for examining education data from every state in the nation, the District of Columbia, and the nation as a whole. Data sets include NAEP assessment results, comparisons among states, released items, and the ability to construct sophisticated queries showing trends in educational achievement over many years.

Must schools participate in NAEP?
Under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, states and districts receiving Title I funds must participate in the NAEP Assessment in grades 4 and 8 in reading and mathematics.

How are schools selected for NAEP?
National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) draws a random sample of students using a long, technical process weighing many school factors, including enrollment, student diversity, and location. The goal of this process is to assemble a testing group representative of the whole state student population with a high degree of accuracy. The selection of this student group does result in some schools being sampled more often than others, especially the larger middle schools. In states with small student numbers, like Montana and numerous others, it takes a great many schools to get a sample large enough to yield valid results. Under these conditions, the odds of being selected repeatedly can be quite high. For more information regarding NAEP sampling, please visit http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/about/samplesfaq.aspx

What is the difference between national NAEP and state NAEP?
National NAEP takes place during even years where only national results are reported.  The sample size for each state is much smaller than in state years and Montana typically has fewer than 20 schools selected. State NAEP takes place during odd years where state and national results are reported at grades 4, 8 and 12 (national).  A State NAEP year requires a much larger sample where (1) every eligible student in our state has the same probability of selection; (2) about 100 schools for each grade and subject are sampled; and (3) about 2,500–3,000 assessed students for each grade and subject.

For a detailed list, of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) please visit: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/faq.asp

For more up-to-date and detailed information, please visit:  Montana NAEP WikiThe Montana NAEP Wiki is regularly maintained and frequently updated with NAEP’s most current activities. It also contains state developed reports and tools for Montana schools.

 

NAEP Resources

Below is some information assembled for schools that have been selected to participate in the 2013 administration of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Montana’s NAEP assessment window is January 28th to March 8th, 2013. We have requested that all NAEP assessments be completed before the state CRT testing begins. This will relieve some previous conflicts experienced when the two test schedules overlapped. As always, students do not need to prepare for the assessment, which takes about 90 minutes, and a given student is tested in only one subject (Reading or Math). Parents must be notified of their student’s selection prior to the assessment, typically in January. If you have other questions or concerns about NAEP, please send me an e-mail at amcgrath@mt.gov, or phone 406.444.3450.

What are the end results of NAEP testing?

  • NAEP produces a valid profile of student achievement in numerous sub-groupings for individual states and the nation as a whole.
  • NAEP results are also used in conjunction with international testing to provide an estimate of relative standing of the U.S. in the world
  • NAEP provides several powerful, publicly available online tools for the analysis of NAEP data, available at http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard

Teacher Resources

For more up-to-date and detailed information, please visit:  Montana NAEP

 CLICK HERE FOR NAEP QUESTIONS

NAEP Questions Tool

NAEP Questions Tool Overview

Information for Educators:
Create your own NAEP test and see what students know and can do. For more information, please visit: http://nationsreportcard.gov/educators.asp

NAEP Item Maps
Item maps help to illustrate what students know and can do in NAEP subject areas by positioning descriptions of individual assessment items along the NAEP scale at each grade level. An item is placed at the point on the scale where students are more likely to give successful responses to it. The descriptions used in NAEP item maps focus on the knowledge and skills needed to respond successfully to the assessment item. For more information, please visit:     http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/itemmaps/index.asp

Test yourself

 CLICK HERE TO TEST YOURSELF

Try sample questions in a variety of subjects for yourself. At the end of the quiz, see how students across the nation performed.

Interactive Computer Tasks (ICTs).These tasks presented students with computer-based environments where students were asked to solve authentic scientific problems. There are nine released ICTs available to the public.

 CLICK HERE FOR ICTS

Hands-On Tasks (HOTs). These tasks gave students real-world contexts where students were asked to demonstrate how well they are able to plan and conduct scientific investigations, reason through complex problems, and apply their scientific knowledge. There are three released HOTs available to the public.

 CLICK HERE FOR HOTS

Introducing NAEP to Teachers. Educators explaining the importance of NAEP, the relevance of NAEP and how it applies to teachers.

 CLICK HERE FOR EDUCATOR INFORMATION

Parent Resources

What every parent should know about NAEP

What Every Parent Should Know About NAEP

For more up-to-date and detailed information, please visit:  Montana NAEP
What Every Parent Should Know About NAEP Brochure

Read eight things parents should know about NAEP
(1) What is NAEP? (2) How is NAEP different? (3) How was my child selected? (4) Are students with disabilities included? (5) Are the data confidential? (6) Can I see the results? (7) How does my state measure up? (8) How can I see sample questions? For more information, please visit:http://nationsreportcard.gov/parents.asp
or find more information at http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/parents/

Information for Students
Encourage students to test themselves using NAEP questions. Show students where they can find answers to their questions about NAEP.   For more information, please visit:http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/students/

Discover Kids Zone - For more information, please visit:  http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/

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School Coordinator Resources

For more up-to-date and detailed information, please visit:  Montana NAEP

School Coordinator Brochure
NAEP 2013 AC Accommodation Training and Overview
NAGB Inclusion Policy
The MyNAEP website is a restricted-use website that contains information on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), widely known as the "Nation's Report Card." This website provides NAEP-related information to states, districts, and schools and is designed and maintained by Westat. MyNAEP is a website providing NAEP assessment information to school and district personnel.

This e-mail list is not all-inclusive but details the communications from the NSC that describe School Coordinator expected responsibilities during the NAEP testing cycle.

Expected e-mails to Montana Schools:

  • Letter 1. Notification to the Authorized Representative that their district has been selected for NAEP.
  • Letter 2. Notification to the Principal that their school has been selected for the NAEP test. Contains information on how many times the school has participated in NAEP and what the district’s Title I status is for participating in NAEP.
  • Letter 3. Notification to the Principal regarding the School Coordinator’s role and a request for the Principal to designate the School Coordinator.
  • Letter 4. Request for School Coordinators to register on www.mynaep.com and to provide school information (PSI).
  • Letter 5. Request for School Coordinators to provide their most current student enrollment for the grade being tested.
  • Letter 6. Request for School Coordinators to send out the Parent Notification Letter.
  • Letter 7. Request for School Coordinators to complete all of their required tasks by the preassessment visit (PAV).
  • Letter 8. Reminder to School Coordinators to send the Parent Guardian Notification Letter home to parents.  Federal law requires that parents be notified that their child has been selected for a NAEP assessment and that student participation is voluntary.
  • Letter 9. This notification is only applicable to schools with exclusions contrary to NAEP and to NAGB’s Inclusion Policy. A request for more information on excluded students with exclusions that are contrary to the state and NAEP allowable SD accommodations and ELL accommodations.

If you have other questions or concerns about the NAEP cycle, your role in the process, your assessment date, or would like to find out more about NAEP itself, please send me an e-mail at amcgrath@mt.gov, or phone 406.444.3450.