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Contact us via email or call us in-state toll-free between 9:00am and 5:00pm MT at 1.888.231.9393, Local 406.444.3095

Indian Education Contacts

Mandy Smoker Broaddus Mandy Smoker Broaddus
Director of Indian Education, 406.444.3013


Vacant
Assistant Division Administrator & Bilingual Specialist, 406.444.3482


Mike Jetty Mike Jetty
Indian Education Specialist, 406.444.0720


Jennifer Jennifer Stadum
Indian Education Implementation Specialist, 406.444.0726

Justine JamJustine Jam
Indian Education Implementation Specialist, 406.444.7490


Sarah PierceSarah Pierce
SIG Teaching and Learning Coordinator and Indian Education Specialist, 406.444.0708


Donnie Wetzel, JrDon Wetzel, Jr.
Statewide Youth & Community Outreach Coordinator, 406.465.8679


Joan FrankeJoan Franke
Administrative Assistant, 406.444.3694

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Indian Education for All Videos

 

Many American Indian musicians continue to perform traditional styles of music, but many others study and perform within musical forms such as American Blues and Rock 'n' Roll. The following video clips feature two Montana American Indian musicians sharing their stories. Please refer to the OPI publication, More Than Flutes and Drums, for more information regarding American Indian music.

Jared Stewart (Crow)
* Right click the above link and choose 'save target as...' or 'save link as...' to download the movie to your computer
Jared Stewart has served as a representative to the Crow Nation's tribal legislature and is a motivational speaker. When performing the blues, he lets his guitar do much of the motivational speaking. Closed Caption version (Open in QuickTime or iTunes)

Gary Small (Northern Cheyenne)
* Right click the above link and choose 'save target as...' or 'save link as...' to download the movie to your computer
The Gary Small Band has multiple Native American Music Awards (NAMA or Nammy) nominations and Small himself, a Northern Cheyenne raised in Montana and Wyoming, won the Songwriter of the Year Nammy in 2002. Closed Caption version (Open QuickTime or iTunes)

Tony Incashola Salish Cultural and Educational Leader, Speaks for the Animals
Tony Incashola tells a Salish origin story of a time before the people were in this area. "The animals spoke for the land," and when the people came to the land, these people became the speakers for the animals. Tony continues with their early travels of the aboriginal territory of the Clark Fork watershed from the area around present day Missoula, "pre-horse," as the eloquent elder would say. The story documents Salish Place Names in the Clark Fork Watershed, known in the Salish language, and the importance of environmental restoration for future generations.

Birthright - Born to Poetry - A Collection of Montana Indian Poetry
Montana American Indian Poet on-line readings. At this site you can watch and listen to poets read their work from the OPI publication: Birthright - Born to Poetry.

Corwin Clairmont, Contemporary Artist
Corwin "Corky" Clairmont is a celebrated contemporary artist from the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Through his work as a printmaker, conceptual and installation artist, he seeks to explore situations that affect Indian Country historically and in contemporary times. His work is highly influenced by tribal issues of sovereignty, colonization, culture, and history. He supports visual arts education by sharing his cultural knowledge, as well as (relief) printmaking skills with Montana students and educators.

Art is the River – with Marina Weatherly
Providing specific Indian Education for All content and context with arts education can offer an exciting, rigorous, meaningful and productive learning experience for Montana’s teachers and students. The arts provide a circular, connecting river, giving the students a vehicle and opportunity to gain an appreciation of other cultures and to make and personally express vital connections with their own culture, identity, place and human experience.
Click here for Part 1 (10:52)
Click here for Part 2 (9:06)
You can download the information mentioned in the video below. All files are PDF's.
Integrating Indian Education for All and the Arts Guidelines
Selected Bibliography for Integrating Indian Education and the Arts

Buffalo and Porcupine Northern Cheyenne Trickster Story Told by Phillip Whiteman, Jr.
Running time 0:5:15:00
Buffalo and Porcupine has a powerful message and gives the listeners an opportunity to reflect upon their own relationships with people; the consequences of individual choices; and how a traditional story can relate to our modern world. There is a lesson plan accompanying the video that facilitates discussion and draws comparisons between traditional American Indian tobacco use and commercial tobacco use.

Long Ago in Montana
Introduces viewers to how people lived before modern conveniences. Topics include food and water, shelter, staying warm, transportation, money (currency) and communication – within the context of the “natural community.” The film features interviews with Montana Tribal representatives and shows the ways in which these traditions continue. Includes a Blackfoot story told by Narcisse Blood. A good ‘Then and Now’ resource.

Talking without Words
Drawing on a wealth of historical resources, students learn about the challenges people face when communicating with people who speak another language. Focus is on ways Native peoples of Montana communicated with each other and with non-Indians. Tribes of Montana

Students learn the tribes of Montana, signs for the tribes, and names they call themselves. Through map reference, students learn where tribes used to live and where they live now. They also recognize communication errors through translation of sign language. Historic film clips from a sign-talker gathering in 1930 and interviews with Montana tribal representatives are featured.

View From the Shore: Native American Perspectives On The Lewis And Clark Expedition
The Indian Education Division is pleased to share with you the following video. We extend our thanks to Black Dog Films for graciously allowing us to reproduce this film for use in schools all across Montana.

The Power of the Drum.When accompanied by the human voice, it helps to maintain and revitalize American Indian cultures. Producer Mike Jetty has first-hand knowledge about both.

A Day in the Life of a Tribal Drummer
A video clip from the Montana Official State Travel Site.

Powerful and insightful videos with specific Montana Indian information from the Montana Official State Travel Site and Montana Office of Tourism:

Sacred Lands From Peaks To Plains – Introducing the First Nations of Montana to the World
Kevin Red Star – Internationally Acclaimed Native American Artist
Darrell Kipp – Apiniokio Peta (Morning Eagle) – Native American Author, Historian and Educator

Excerpts from American Indian Homelands
The following clip is from American Indian Homelands: Matters of truth, honor and dignity-immemorial. The film clip contains interviews with several American Indian leaders offering their perspectives on historic and contemporary land issues.

The film powerfully highlights efforts to redress more than a century’s worth of legal and political moves undermining Indian land ownership and sovereignty, going back to the 1887 General Allotment Act. The national fight to recover lost lands is being led by the Twin Cities-based Indian Tenure Land Foundation.

Click To Play

Learn How People Lived, Long Ago . . .

August 4th, 2006
Running Time: 00:29:28:15

Suggested grade level: 2nd Grade

Introduces how people lived before modern conveniences. Topics include food and water, shelter, staying warm, transportation, money (currency) and communication – within the context of the “natural community.” The film features interviews with Montana Tribal representatives and shows the ways in which these traditions continue. Includes a Blackfoot story told by Narcisse Blood. Good ‘Then and Now’ resource.

DVD Guide - Long Ago in Montana
Transcript of Long Ago in Montana

Regional Learning Project
Produced by Regional Learning Project, Missoula, MT

Click To Play

Talking Without Words: Early Inter-Tribal Communication in Montana

August 22th, 2006
Running Time: 00:22:11:17

Suggested grade level: 6th Grade

Drawing on a wealth of historical resources, students learn about the challenges people face when communicating with people who speak another language. Focus is on ways Native peoples of Montana communicated with each other and with non-Indians.
DVD Guide - Talking without Words
Transcript of Talking without Words

Regional Learning Project
Produced by Regional Learning Project, Missoula, MT

Click To Play

The Tribes of Montana: How They Got Their Names

August 4th, 2006
Running Time: 00:33:44:27

Suggested grade level: 4th Grade

Students learn the tribes of Montana, signs for the tribes, and names they call themselves. Through map reference, students learn where tribes used to live and where they live now. They also recognize communication errors through translation of sign language. Historic film clips from a sign-talker gathering in 1930 and interviews with Montana tribal representatives are featured.

DVD Guide - Tribes of Montana

Transcript of Tribes of Montana

Correction Notice for Tribes of Montana

Regional Learning Project
Produced by Regional Learning Project, Missoula, MT

Click To Play

Native American Perspectives on the Lewis & Clark Expedition

August 25th, 2006
Running Time: 00:27:25:83

"In the distance I hear them paddle their boat up river. They speak in a strange tongue. But I know them because of prophecy foretold them coming. They come in peace and bring gifts. Gifts offered as generosity, couched in innocence. Only they have come to take, not give. I watch from the shore, helpless to stop them and they leave me in their wake, little more than a shadow of myself . . . "

Transcript of View From the Shore

Black Dog Films Logo
Produced by Black Dog Films, Bozeman, Montana
1102 West Babcock Suite B
Bozeman, Montana 59715
406-444-3563

Funded in part by the Montana Committee for the Humanities.

Click To Play

Focus on the Power of the Drum

September 1st, 2006
Running Time: 00:10:40:82

The power of the drum, when accompanied by the human voice helps to maintain and revitalize American Indian cultures. Producer Mike Jetty has first-hand knowledge about both.

MT PBS Logo
Produced by Montana PBS

Click To Play

Excerpts from American Indian Homelands

Hosted by Sam Donaldson
Running Time: 00:11:17:41

The following clip is from American Indian Homelands: Matters of truth, honor and dignity-immemorial. The film clip contains interviews with several American Indian leaders offering their perspectives on historic and contemporary land issues.

The film powerfully highlights efforts to redress more than a century’s worth of legal and political moves undermining Indian land ownership and sovereignty, going back to the 1887 General Allotment Act.  The national fight to recover lost lands is being led by the Twin Cities-based Indian Tenure Land Foundation.

To order the entire film visit the Indian Land Tenure Foundation Website

Our gratitude goes out to the Indian Land Tenure Foundation for granting OPI permission to video stream this valuable educational resource.

Visit the Indian Land Tenure Foundation.